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Building the bean tunnel

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Over the years of our opening the garden we have had so many comments about the hazel tunnel we build every year or so (depending on the winter weather) that I thought we’d give you a quick insight into how it is constructed.

First of all, harvest your hazel poles.  We are fortunate in having two areas from which we can select just the right size sticks, although those in our new field will need quite a few years of management before they give a useable crop.

Here’s Sue, with trusty Silky saw, down by the river.

 

Make sure you have enough and they are long enough

Then assemble your tools;

Something to make good deep holes in your soil

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Lots of good string – here we have sisal baler twine

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and two people.

Work out how long the row needs to be and make a start, keeping the distance between the opposing sticks as close the same as possible.

Here we are after the first half a dozen (out of 27 pairs)

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You’ll see later the process of matching up the two opposing sticks works.

Tie in the two sticks to make the arch, making sure you keep a constant height all along – it will make things easier later.

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Here we have about half of the arches complete.

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and this is how you make them

 

 

Speedy aren’t we??

Now it’s just a case of tying it all together. First with long straight sticks along the apex to make sure the spacing is correct.

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then the all important side sticks, woven in (it’s not that easy) to provide a really solid framework.

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And, in the immortal words of Blue Peter, here’s one I made earlier.  Actually, WE made today.

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Tunnels like this have survived snow, rain and high winds and provide a lovely, easy way to pick your beans.

Now all that’s needed is a bit of warmer weather to plant the beans!

Here’s what it looked like in Summer 2018

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Perfect Compost making – and a plea

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We were due to hold one of Sue’s “excellent” (participant’s quote, not ours!) Compost Making workshops at the beginning of June, but that isn’t now going to happen due to the virus.

So we’ve made this short video to whet your appetite for some date in the future.

This is just a very quick run through of the why’s and wherefore’s of making a really wonderful compost which you can use in so many ways around the garden.

As we are also not going to be able to open for the National Garden Scheme as planned at the end of May, we are looking for ways of replacing the £1000+ that we are normally able to pass to the scheme to support such a wonderful set of health and nursing charities.

So, if you like this video, find it useful or are just wanting a way to support the NGS charities, we have set up a JustGiving page where all donations will go directly to the NGS to help make up the expected 80% shortfall in funds this year.

Please just click here (or use the QR code below) and give what you can to support health workers at Macmillan, Marie Curie, Queen’s Nursing Institute and others.  It is so important at this time.

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“The answer lies in the soil!”

Comments Off on “The answer lies in the soil!”

That’s what I seem to remember was always the answer that the likes of Percy Thrower and his ilk used to trot out on Gardeners Question Time in the old days.

….. well maybe, but it’s what you put into the soil that is what makes it so good.

With that in mind Sue held the first of her Compost Making and Using courses here at Nantybedd Garden today.   A dozen trusting souls reached deep into their wallets and diced with the timber lorries to spend nearly six hours talking about … Compost!

So great was the anticipation that the ‘car park’ was full a good 20 minutes beforehand – maybe lured by the smell of Sue T’s scrumptious cake with the early morning tea.

Eventually they settled down to discuss why they felt they needed help.  It seemed to be a long talk.

Getting into the swing of it

This was followed by a presentation of the do’s and dont’s, the sources of learned composting and how ’tis done here at Nant y Bedd.

Fortunately the delicious quiches for lunch were a bit delayed as the discussion around the slides ran over by quite a bit!

Lunch included not only the aforementioned quiches, with our own eggs and some interesting foraged ingredients, a salad largely gleaned from the garden and yet more scrummy cakes, this time from that multi-talented gardener/ painter and cake maker Caroline.

The spread!

 

Chance to chat over lunch

After lunch there was an opportunity to work off the excesses on a tour of the various compost heaps around the garden and an indication of how and where to use compost, leaf mould and other such mulches.

The “FC Bin” awaiting pumpkins

Needless to say the cats got in on the act, with Smudge rounding up stragglers and Oreo hitching a lift.

With perfect timing, Sue rolled back the cover on one of the heaps and there was ….

… a slowworm, enjoying the warmth

But it wasn’t all theory.  Over the last few weeks I’ve been instructed to place piles of ‘stuff’ up in the pig field.  Now I know why!  The assembled company was asked to help in constructing a ‘windrow’, a sort of open compost heap.

Here’s how you do it!

After this it was back to the garden room to discuss what was learnt.  A Nant y Bedd Garden postcard was issued to all present, along with a pencil, to record the three things that each participant would be doing in the future to make better compost.

A bit more tea and a (futile) attempt to finish off the cakes and the assembled cast was given a sachet of QR Compost Activator to go home with – but only after they had visited the plant stall and bought a compost duvet or two.

If you think this is for you, there’s another course booked on 27th June with a few places left and one pencilled in for September.  Get in touch, now.