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Virtual Tour of Nantybedd Garden – Part Three

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Concluding our virtual tour of the garden as it was this May. It has been an interesting exercise, not least in the decision making process of what constitutes a ‘good’ picture and what doesn’t – let’s just say we din’t agree every time!

Day 10

The wildflower meadow. A little bit of cheating here, as we have included some shots of flowers in our new field, part of which will become a wildflower haven in the future, and a couple of things from the cottage garden. But first of all….

The path through the meadow by the pond
Fox and Cubs by the house
Yellow rattle by the apple trees
Aquilegia by the pond
Ox-eye daisy
Stitchwort in the new field
Lady’s smock
Pignut, plus some Lady’s Smock and buttercup
…and a dew covered cobweb!

Day 11

The star of Alan Titchmarsh’s visit last year, when I had to give him a telling off for running on the bridge and scaring the ducks – watch the clip posted last autumn!

Built about 12 years ago to Sue’s specifications by Daryl Rogers, the rope bridge is always a big talking point for visitors – some think it is too wobbly, others just want to cross it again and again.

Low-down looking towards the pond
Looking from the pond …
…and looking from a higher point

Day 12

We come back across the road to the original areas of the garden around the house. Immediately around the house is the Cottage Garden.

Bright morning sun illuminates the planting by the patio
The wonderful bronze leaved Rodgersia
The Alliums are looking good this year
A bit of everything below the greenhouse!
Sweet Rocket, with Iris and Bistort behind by the little pond
I think the run-off from the compost heap makes this lot grow so well!
Alpine strawberry, carrot, parsnip and, in the background, peas
Flowering Chives, Myrtle, Good King Henry and dark purple Aquilegia

Day 13

We reach the end of the tour in the Forest Fruit Garden where we find not only the usual strawberries, raspberries, gooseberries, redcurrants and blackcurrants, rhubarb, blueberries, asparagus and walnuts but unusual things like Honeyberry, Japanese Wineberry (taste like wine gums!), a tea bush and …

..the Sichuan peppercorn tree, with Aquilegia and Welsh Poppies
in the foreground is the Asparagus bed
Strawberries? Yes! Musk Strawberries- native of Eastern Europe.
One of the Plane Trees lit by the early morning sun
Looking across the Cottage garden from under the Walnut Tree
Fancy a cuppa?
Stunning Maple (l) and Walnut tree (r) shade the comfrey bed
A bit of art to finish off!

We’ll probably post some bonus pictures – those that didn’t quite make the final cut in the next week or so, but we hope you enjoy being able to ‘visit’ our garden even though you can’t actually be here at the moment.

A Virtual Tour of Nantybedd Garden – Part 2

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The second of what will be three parts of our current virtual tour of the garden.

Day 6

We move into the Spooky Forest. Planted many, many years ago by the Forestry Commission as a Christmas tree nursery – if you are good with heights we’ll lend you a saw to cut a ‘tree’ from the tops!! – and never really managed. There’s also some lovely, huge, Douglas Fir at each end, and a few stands of Ash, at the moment.

Looking skyward- there’s Christmas trees up there!
Not all logs reach the fireplace.
This lovely rill lined with wood sorrel runs through
…and Wild Garlic is starting to thrive
We hope we don’t lose this lovely old Ash
The Eagle’s Nest – something odd happened up there!
Why it’s called the Spooky Forest!
Name the native broadleaf trees in this pic!

Day 7

Do you remember the song “Down by the Riverside”? Well, that’s where we were on day seven. We’ve about 250 yards of river along this stretch (plus about another 350 alongside our new field) and, after clearing decades of brash and brambles, all sorts of flowers have sprung up.

Bluebells and Stitchwort, with Ian’s fave chair in the background
The stone in the river is quite geometric
Ferns unfurling
More bluebell with Pignut
A nice place to sit and let the world go by …
…or climb down and dangle your toes in the water

Day 8

Heading back into the garden, hidden in the embrace of an 178 year old Sycamore (we have its birth certificate, if you don’t believe me!) is our much loved treehouse. Designed and built by Dan Tuckett (after an initial plan by Mick Petts) with help from tree-climber Oli Stinchcombe, it is both a thing of beauty and a great place to spend some quality time listening to the birds and the river.

The shape of the tree was just crying out for this, and Dan and Oli managed to do it all with only three (stainless steel) bolts into the tree itself, the rest is clamped round and counter-balanced. Fantastic job!

The main A-frame
Looking down the path with the new gate in the distance
View from the new field
Halfway seat – with convenient drink holder!
Looking back toward the turbine house …
…and down to the river.

Day 9

Today we get to the pond. A wonderful place to sit and chill, or even more wonderful to slip into and bash out a few lengths of breaststroke. The border planting keeps the water crystal clear by gulping up any algae-inducing nutrients and looks beautiful as well. If the weather turns, then a quick dash to the shelter of the Shepherd’s Hut is all that is needed.

Grasses can be beautiful too
Pale lilac Iris just coming into show
Cotton grass and looking down the valley
Shepherd’s Hut and Sue’s little yacht
Big Gunnera and huge Douglas Fir behind
Sit, sleep or read – the choice is there

Do enjoy our pictures. We are not sure at present whether we will be able to open this year. But keep watching here and on Instagram.

More pics in a few days